Trauma & Executive Function Series

Executive functions: emotional control and response inhibition 

Sasha-Gay Brown (Trauma and Attachment Advisor, Virtual School) and Dr Kate Payne (Educational Psychologist) introduce two components of executive functions: emotional control and response inhibition. ‘Emotional control’ is the capacity to manage emotions and feelings to respond appropriately. ‘Response inhibition’ is the capacity to think before acting. Some children or young people may have difficulty in one or more of these areas. Research tells us that providing young people with the knowledge of executive function skills and empowering them with a toolbox of strategies can be effective to support them in this area. Consequently, this video will provide foster carers, parents and school staff with activities and examples to be able to teach the child or young person in mind about emotional control and response inhibition and provide a reflective space to consider strategies to support. In particular, Sasha-Gay Brown discusses the three R’s (regulate, relate and reason), calming brain-stem exercises, and trauma transition activities.

Executive functions: organisation, planning and prioritisation 

Dr Kate Payne (Educational Psychologist) introduce two components of executive functions: organisation and planning and prioritisation. ‘Organisation’ is the capacity to create and maintain a system to keep track of information and materials. ‘Planning and prioritisation’ is the capacity to plan out steps to reach a goal and prioritise which is most important. Some children or young people may have difficulty in one or more of these areas. Research tells us that providing young people with the knowledge of executive function skills and empowering them with a toolbox of strategies can be effective to support them in this area. Consequently, this video will provide foster carers, parents and school staff with activities and examples to be able to teach the child or young person in mind about organisation and planning and prioritisation and provide a reflective space to consider strategies to support.

 

Executive functions: task initiation and time management 

Dr Kate Payne (Educational Psychologist) introduce two components of executive functions: task initiation and time management. ‘Task initiation’ is the capacity to begin projects in a timely fashion and ‘time management’ is the capacity to estimate how much time you have and how to use it to stay within time limits and deadlines. Some children or young people may have difficulty in one or more of these areas. Research tells us that providing young people with the knowledge of executive functioning skills and empowering them with a toolbox of strategies can be effective to support them in this area. Consequently, this video will provide foster carers, parents and school staff with activities and examples to be able to teach the child or young person in mind about task initiation and time management and provide a reflective space to consider strategies to support.

Executive functions: goal directedness, flexibility and meta-cognition   

Dr Kate Payne (Educational Psychologist) introduce three components of executive functions: goal directedness, flexibility and meta-cognition. ‘Goal directedness’ is the capacity to achieve a goal without being distracted by competing interests. ‘Flexibility’ is the capacity to see many sides of an idea or situation and being able to change or adapt. ‘Meta-cognition’ is thinking about thinking. Some children or young people may have difficulty in one or more of these areas. Research tells us that providing young people with the knowledge of executive function skills and empowering them with a toolbox of strategies can be effective to support them in this area. Consequently, this video will provide foster carers, parents and school staff with activities and examples to be able to teach the child or young person in mind about goal directedness, flexibility and meta-cognition and provide a reflective space to consider strategies to support.

 

Executive functions: working memory and attention 

Dr Lisa Carmody and Dr Kate Payne (Educational Psychologists) introduce two components of executive functions: working memory and attention. ‘Working memory’ is the capacity to hold in mind information to carry out a task. ‘Sustained attention’  is the capacity to pay attention to a task, despite low interest or distractions. Some children or young people may have difficulty in one or more of these areas. Research tells us that providing young people with the knowledge of executive function skills and empowering them with a toolbox of strategies can be effective to support them in this area. Consequently, this video will provide foster carers, parents and school staff with activities and examples to be able to teach the child or young person in mind about working memory and attention and provide a reflective space to consider strategies to support.

 

Executive functions: Introduction  

 

Sasha-Gay Brown (Trauma and Attachment Advisor, Virtual School) and Dr Kate Payne (Educational Psychologist) introduce the executive function and trauma series. Executive function is an umbrella term for the interrelated cognitive processes involved in executing a task. It helps to monitor and control our thoughts and actions. Some children and young people may have had adverse experiences in their childhood resulting in trauma and attachment difficulties. This can result in a difficulty in the development of their executive function skills and therefore may impact on the cognitive processes required to achieve in school and complete everyday tasks. This video is aimed at foster carers, parents and school staff supporting children and young people who may have had adverse experiences in their early life and provides a summary of the impact of trauma on development and what executive functions are